Standard Gyokuro Brew

Our standard recipe for brewing loose-leaf gyokuro. Brew a cup when you feel you need a change of pace. The concentrated umami in the cup can feel as though it had been squeezed out of freshly-picked tea leaves. To get all the umami, make sure to cool the water sufficiently after boiling.

1. Measure the leaves
2 tbsp. (10 g / 0.35 oz)
Add tea leaves to a kyusu or teapot.
Silver tablespoon filled with dried rolled Ippodo Gyokuro premium Japanese green tea leaves with
Silver tablespoon filled with dried rolled Ippodo Gyokuro premium Japanese green tea leaves with
Standard Gyokuro Brew
Makes one pot
1. Measure the leaves
2 tbsp. (10 g / 0.35 oz)
Add tea leaves to a kyusu or teapot.
2. Add hot water
80 mL (3 oz) 60°C (140°F)
Cool boiling water to 60°C by transferring 3 times.
Three porcelain teacups beside a small porcelain kyusu with arrows instructing to transfer tea from one vessel to the next
Three porcelain teacups beside a small porcelain kyusu with arrows instructing to transfer tea from one vessel to the next
Standard Gyokuro Brew
Makes one pot
2. Add hot water
80 mL (3 oz) 60°C (140°F)
Cool boiling water to 60°C by transferring 3 times.
3. Brew
90 seconds
Brew without stirring or disturbing the tea leaves.
Small white porcelain Japanese kyusu teapot with blue logo on lid sitting beside orange stop watch timer on white table
Small white porcelain Japanese kyusu teapot with blue logo on lid sitting beside orange stop watch timer on white table
Standard Gyokuro Brew
Makes one pot
3. Brew
90 seconds
Brew without stirring or disturbing the tea leaves.
4. Serve
Pour out every last drop.
Enjoy in your favorite teacup or mug.
Pouring light green tea from white porcelain Hasami-yaki kyusu teapot with blue logo into white porcelain Japanese teacup
Pouring light green tea from white porcelain Hasami-yaki kyusu teapot with blue logo into white porcelain Japanese teacup
Standard Gyokuro Brew
Makes one pot
4. Serve
Pour out every last drop.
Enjoy in your favorite teacup or mug.

Products using this recipe

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